Welcome to Kentucky Girls Books!

The Books  |  The Authors  |  The Readers  |  Teaching Tools
              Fictional tales of Kentucky girls from long ago to excite and inspire today's Kentucky girls
subglobal2 link | subglobal2 link | subglobal2 link | subglobal2 link | subglobal2 link | subglobal2 link | subglobal2 link
subglobal3 link | subglobal3 link | subglobal3 link | subglobal3 link | subglobal3 link | subglobal3 link | subglobal3 link
subglobal4 link | subglobal4 link | subglobal4 link | subglobal4 link | subglobal4 link | subglobal4 link | subglobal4 link
subglobal5 link | subglobal5 link | subglobal5 link | subglobal5 link | subglobal5 link | subglobal5 link | subglobal5 link
subglobal6 link | subglobal6 link | subglobal6 link | subglobal6 link | subglobal6 link | subglobal6 link | subglobal6 link
subglobal7 link | subglobal7 link | subglobal7 link | subglobal7 link | subglobal7 link | subglobal7 link | subglobal7 link
subglobal8 link | subglobal8 link | subglobal8 link | subglobal8 link | subglobal8 link | subglobal8 link | subglobal8 link
 
It may or may not be due to global warming, but we've sure had weird weather this year.

We went from bitter, bone-chilling cold to almost unbearable heat and humidity in what was supposed to be spring, usually the most beautiful and comfortable time of year here in Kentucky. But, with those frequent and radical weather swings, sometimes in just a day or two of one another, this spring was anything but normal. And, summer's turning out no better.

Gardners whether they grow flowers or vegetables, like Rebecca claims to do, have been going crazy trying to manage their gardens and guess when and how much to water. Rebecca is so frustrated this growing season that she says she's tempted to abandon her garden and concentrate on her writing. That would be great for those of you waiting for her next book.

As far as writing is concerned, Rebecca is still researching and working on her book about Kentucky mountain music during the 1930s. She says it's fascinating. The 1930s in Kentucky was a time when "barn dances" were becoming popular on what was then a new-fangled invention called radio. In addition to providing exciting listening opportunities, the growth of local radio brought musicians flocking to Renfro Valley which became a popular music venue for concerts and radio broadcasts. It also gave young girls with good voices a chance -- or, at least, a hope -- of breaking into show business and moving to a big city like Chicago. We hope you'll enjoy these new stories from Renfro Valley when they're published.

The Kentucky girls in our books are brave, young women who face serious problems in historically accurate settings.
Bek at Nicholasville library
 
Rebecca & Marie at the Jessamine County Author Fair.
Our stories of long ago are meant to inspire Kentucky girls of today to support women’s issues while finding their own place in the world.
cover of 'Tis a Gift    'Tis a Gift is the second Kentucky Girls book in our Shaker series.
 
            Here's the first chapter for you to read:
 
Tad felt the earth shake beneath him in the dew-drenched pasture seconds before the shouting started.
 
“Run! Run for your lives!”
 
Tad’s eyes darted from the page on his lap to the parade of pounding feet racing past him. The tight pack of boys, yelling as they ran, headed straight for the stone fence a few yards away and scrambled over it so frantically they caused a minor rockslide.
 
It didn’t matter what they were running from; if it was enough to scare the big boys, it was enough to scare Tad, too. He leaped up and dashed toward the fence as fast as his short legs would carry him. He planted the toe of his boot between two solid rocks and hoisted himself halfway up the fence before he remembered.
 
© 2018 Kentucky Girls Books      |  Send us an e-mail.