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              Fictional tales of Kentucky girls from long ago to excite and inspire today's Kentucky girls
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With a little luck and hard work, one or more new books will come out in 2019.

There was good news and bad news for Rebecca due to the extreme swings between bitter, bone-chilling cold and almost unbearable heat that Kentucky experienced in 2018. The bad news was: the extreme weather ruined any chance for her to have a productive vegetable garden this year. The good news was: keeping her inside and out of the garden gave her much more time to devote to her writing. And, as a result, this summer ended up being much more productive for her writing than any previous summer.

Her greatest progress was on the book she's been writing about Kentucky mountain music during the 1930s. She said her research has been fascinating, and she's thoroughly enjoyed sharing and getting feedback on her rough drafts from the members of her writer's support group. They've been meeting weekly to critique and encourage one another's writing efforts, and it's really helping Rebecca move ahead.

The music story is set in the 1930s, a time when old-fashioned "barn dances" featuring country music first became popular on what was then a new-fangled invention called radio. In Kentucky, a new radio station in the Renfro Valley attracted scores of musicians to the area and turned it into a popular venue for live concerts as well as radio broadcasts. It also gave girls with good voices a chance - or, at least, a dream - of breaking into show business and moving to a big city like Nashville or Chicago. Rebecca's book will tell the story of one such girl.

Two other long-delayed books about the 1920's Kentucky "Cave Wars" also had a good summer. They underwent significant re-writing and polishing which brought them even closer to being ready for final printing. It's now almost a race to see whether the Renfro Valley music book or the cave books will be published first.

Kentucky girls in our books are brave, young women who have to face serious problems.
Bek at Nicholasville library
 
Marie & Rebecca at the Jessamine County Author Fair.
These stories of long ago should encourage today's Kentucky girls to support women’s issues and find their place in the world.
 
 
cover of Road to Pleasant Hill
 
   Road to Pleasant Hill begins our three-book Shaker series.
 
    Here's the start of a sample chapter you can read online.
 
Betsy had barely closed her eyes when she heard a breathy, hacking noise coming from one of the nearby beds. It sounded deep and raspy, like the way Tad coughed when he had the croup as a baby.
 
Betsy looked over at Grace. From the rise and fall of the blankets, and the deep sighs coming from beneath them, she could tell Grace was sound asleep. There it was again, a bit muffled, but definitely a cough. It must be coming from Ruth, Betsy thought. Ruth was the only other person in the room.
 
Peeking over the covers, Betsy adjusted her eyes to the moonlight that bathed the room. With Ruth’s bed right next to hers, Betsy could easily watch a thin, white arm snake from beneath the blankets and reach under the mattress. The arm pulled out what looked like a small twig of dried leaves.
 
Betsy watched as the dark-haired girl propped herself up, plucked part of a leaf from the twig, and slipped it into her mouth. Ruth tucked the twig back under the mattress. Within minutes, the room was quiet again. ...
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